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Cloud Computing

Oracle Wants to Beat Amazon in IaaS, PaaS

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Oracle Wants to Beat Amazon in IaaS, PaaS

Larry Ellison opens Oracle's OpenWorld 2016 with the bold declaration that "Amazon's lead is over," and announces plans to go after the Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) market next year. 

Currently, Amazon Web Services (AWS) leads the cloud infrastructure market, with Microsoft Azure, Google Cloud Platform, and IBM trailing behind. Oracle’s public cloud didn't have enough market share to even be included the most recent version of Gartner’s cloud infrastructure as a service (IaaS) Magic Quadrant.

Amazon launched the EC2 service for renting out VM instances by the hour in 2006, and, in the most recent quarter, the AWS portfolio earned Amazon  $2.88 billion in sales and $718 million in operating income.

“But now we’re aggressively moving into infrastructure, and we have a new generation of data centers that we’re building around the world,” Ellison says.

For one example, Oracle is making available the Dense IO Shape (a virtual-machine type in this Oracle second-generation of cloud) which offers 28.8TB, 512GB, and 36 cores-- at a price of $5.40 per hour. More than 10X the input-output capacity of Amazon AWS, specifically the i2.8xlarge, says Ellison.

The founder-turned-CTO also says Oracle currently faces two main competitors-- Amazon for infrastructure and Workday for applications. This represents what Ellison describes as a "breathtaking change," since historically the two main Oracle rivals were IBM and SAP.

How will Oracle rival Amazon? First off, the Oracle Cloud Platform public cloud and virtual cloud network offerings get bare metal servers, providing means for customers to step to the cloud without moving away entirely from on-premises infrastructure. The Oracle Cloud Platform also gets support for Oracle MySQL Cloud Service, Oracle Big Data Cloud Service and Oracle Event Hub Cloud Service, alongside other Oracle PaaS offerings.

In the meantime the Ravello Cloud Service allows organisations to run enterprise VMware and kernel-based virtual machine workloads in a public cloud without need for changes or reconfiguration, the Oracle Container Cloud allows the deployment of application stacks through Docker compatibility and OracleFastConnect helps the connection of datacentres to the cloud.

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IBM Opens First Nordics Cloud Datacentre

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IBM Opens First Nordics Cloud Datacentre

IBM opens a cloud datacentre in Norway, specifically in Fetsund, around 30km outside the capital Oslo-- the 12th European facility for the company and its 48th around the globe.

Big Blue describes the datacentre as an industry first in the Nordics. It is the result of a 2014 investment worth over $1 billion in the building of more facilities able to deal with growing demand for cloud computing from businesses ranging from large enterprises to startups. The company lists a number of IBM Cloud customers in the region, such as Cxense, EVRY, KONE, Opera and Sapa Group.

The datacentre provides the full range of IBM Cloud services, including bare metal and virtual servers, storage, security services and networking. All can be deployed on demand with full remote access and control, and the datacentre is connected to other IBM public datacentres on the continent and around the world to allow for easy data transfer and replication in multiple locations.

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Gartner: Public Cloud Services to Grow 17% in 2016

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Gartner: Public Cloud Services to Grow 17% in 2016

Gartner projects global public cloud services will reach $208.6 billion in 2016, a 17.2% increase (from $178bn in 2015)-- with the highest growth coming from cloud systems infrastructure services (IaaS).

The analyst says cloud systems infrastructure services are to grow by 42.8% in 2016, while cloud application services (Saa) will grow by 21.7% to reach $38.9bn.

"Growth of public cloud is supported by the fact that organizations are saving 14% of their budgets as an outcome of public cloud adoption, according to Gartner's 2015 cloud adoption survey," Gartner remarks. "However, the aspiration for using cloud services outpaces actual adoption. There's no question there is great appetite within organisations to use cloud services, but there are still challenges for organisations as they make the move to the cloud. Even with the high rate of predicted growth, a large number of organisations still have no current plans to use cloud services."

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Mirantis Extends Capabilities With TCP Cloud

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Mirantis Extends Capabilities With TCP Cloud

Mirantis plans to enhance OpenStack capabilities with the acquisition of TCP Cloud, a Czech managed services provider specialised in OpenStack, OpenContrail and Kubernetes.

The TCP Cloud product offering is called MK.20. Known as a managing infrastrucutre-as-code, it is used by top public cloud players such as AWS, Google Compute Cloud and Microsoft Azure to maintain clouds. Post-acquisition it will be merged with Fuel, the software platform handling the deployment and management of OpenStack and related open source infrastructure software.

The Czech company employs 30 people. Financial details of its acquisition are not officially available, but sources say it was worth around $30 million.

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Microsoft Opens UK Datacentres

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Microsoft Opens UK Datacentres

Microsoft claims to be the first global provider to deliver the "complete cloud" from UK datacentres, an obvious swipe at Amazon brought about with the opening of facilities in London, Cardiff and Durham.

The datacentres currently host Azure and Office 365 services, with Dynamics CRM Online to follow from H1 2017. The facilities were first announced back in November 2015. Previously UK-based Microsoft customers had to depend on datacentres in either Ireland and Amsterdam if they wanted to remain in Europe. As a result, the company can now satisfy any local data residency and replication needs for business continuity.

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